How Much Baking Soda Do You Need to Raise the pH in Your Pool?

If you’re wondering how much baking soda you need to raise the pH in your pool, you’ve come to the right place. In this blog post, we’ll give you a rundown of everything you need to know on the subject.

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Introduction

When your pool’s pH levels are too low, it’s said to be “acidic.” If the levels are too high, it’s “basic” or “alkaline.” This range is from 0 to 14 on the pH scale, with 7.0 being neutral. Swimming in an acidic or basic pool can irritate your skin, eyes, and lungs. It can also corrode pool equipment and discolor your swimsuit.

How Baking Soda Raises pH

Sodium bicarbonate (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate), commonly known as baking soda, is a salt that is basic in nature. When dissolved in water, it forms an alkaline solution. Baking soda is a popular choice for raising the pH of swimming pools because it’s readily available, inexpensive and less likely to cause skin and eye irritation than some other pool chemicals.

The recommended amount of baking soda to add to your pool depends on the size of your pool and the desired level of pH increase. Most pool experts recommend adding 1/2 pound of baking soda per 100 gallons of water to raise the pH by 0.2 units. For example, if your pool has 20,000 gallons of water and you want to raise the pH by 0.4 units, you would need to add 4 pounds (1/2 pound x 8) of baking soda to the water.

The Right Amount of Baking Soda

Knowing how much baking soda to add to your pool is important because adding too much can make your pH levels rise too high. The ideal pH level for swimming pools is 7.4-7.6, and adding baking soda can help you reach that goal.

To raise the pH level in your pool by 0.2, you will need to add 1 pound of baking soda per 10,000 gallons of water. This means that if you have a 20,000 gallon pool, you will need to add 2 pounds of baking soda. It is important to slowly add the baking soda to the pool so that the pH level does not rise too quickly. You should also test the pH levels regularly so that you can monitor the progress and make sure that you are not adding too much baking soda.

How to Test pH and Alkalinity

Although measuring the pH of your pool water is important, it’s only part of the story. To get a complete picture of your pool’s water chemistry, you also need to test for alkalinity.

pH and alkalinity are closely related, but they are not the same thing. Alkalinity is a measure of the water’s ability to resist changes in pH. In other words, it’s a measure of the water’s buffering capacity.

pH is measured on a scale of 0 to 14, with 7 being neutral. Anything below 7 is acidic, and anything above 7 is alkaline. The ideal pH for pool water is between 7.4 and 7.6.

Alkalinity is measured on a scale of 0 to 200 ppm (parts per million). The ideal alkalinity for pool water is between 80 and 120 ppm.

To test for pH and alkalinity, you will need two chemicals: phenol red solution and sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). You will also need a pH test kit or an electronic pH meter.

How to Add Baking Soda to Your Pool

If your pool’s pH level is too low, it can be raised by adding baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate. Baking soda will not only raise the pH level of your pool water, but it will also alkalize the water to make it less acidic. The amount of baking soda you’ll need to add to your pool water depends on the size of your pool and the current pH level.

To raise the pH level in a small, 12-foot diameter pool by 1 point, you’ll need to add 1 pound of baking soda. If your pool is larger, or you want to raise the pH by 2 points, you’ll need to add 2 pounds of baking soda.

Conclusion

After testing the pH levels of your pool water, you may find that you need to raise the pH. This is most commonly done by adding baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate, to the water. The amount of baking soda you’ll need to add depends on the size of your pool and the current pH level.

To raise the pH by one unit, you’ll need to add about 2.4 pounds of baking soda for every 10,000 gallons of water. For example, if your pool is 20,000 gallons and has a pH level of 7.5, you would need to add 4.8 pounds (2.4 x 2) of baking soda to raise the pH to 8.5

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